Hidden Brain The Hidden Brain helps curious people understand the world – and themselves. Using science and storytelling, Hidden Brain's host Shankar Vedantam reveals the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, the biases that shape our choices, and the triggers that direct the course of our relationships.

Today's college students aren't necessarily having more sex than previous generations, but the culture that permeates hookups on campus has changed. Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

Hookup Culture: The Unspoken Rules Of Sex On College Campuses

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Examining Links Between Academic Performance And Food Stamps

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Why We Can't Shake Life's 'Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda' Moments

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Study Looks At How People Think About Free Speech

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How President Trump's Rhetoric Is Changing The Way Americans Talk

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Are you feeling stuck? Scroll down to take our quiz and find out whether you have a "gravity" problem. Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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You 2.0: How Silicon Valley Can Help You Get Unstuck

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Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible, but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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You 2.0: Why We're Bad At Predicting Our Own Happiness — And How We Can Get Better

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A messy life can be a well-lived life, according to author and economist Tim Harford. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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You 2.0: Why Disorder May Be Good For Us

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Every time you give in to your phone or computer that's buzzing with notifications, you pay a price: little by little, you lose your ability to focus. Tom Merton/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

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Tom Merton/Getty Images/Caiaimage

You 2.0: The Value Of 'Deep Work' In An Age Of Distraction

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Hidden Brain: How Cigarette Taxes Affect Food Buying

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Researchers Examine When People Are More Susceptible To Fake News

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According to research from Harvard, between 10% and 40% of the kids who intend to go to college at the time of high school graduation don't actually show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon "summer melt," and it has long been a puzzling problem. S_e_P_p/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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S_e_P_p/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

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Could you hit a toy robot with a hammer? The answer to that question might tell you more about yourself than you'd think. Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Can Robots Teach Us What It Means To Be Human?

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Pain Before Pleasure Makes The Pleasure Even Better, Study Finds

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Some People Are Great At Recognizing Faces. Others...Not So Much

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Research shows birth order really does matter. Catherine Delahaye/Getty Images hide caption

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Research Shows Birth Order Really Does Matter

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New study shows child care centers don't necessarily hire the most qualified teachers. Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury/Getty Images hide caption

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Child Care Centers Often Don't Hire The Most Qualified Teachers, Study Shows

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From sports, to politics, to the stock market, we love to make (and hear) predictions. This week, Hidden Brain explores why the so-called experts are so often wrong, and how we can avoid the common pitfalls of telling the future. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

Degrees of Maybe: How We Can All Make Better Predictions

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