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Much of the movie 'Contact' was filmed at the Very Large Array in New Mexico. Erin Slonaker/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Slonaker/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Armed demonstrators protest in Lansing, Michigan, during a rally organized by Michigan United for Liberty on May 14 to protest the coronavirus pandemic stay-at-home orders. Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer said on May 13 that protests against the state's emergency orders might make it necessary for the state to keep restrictions in place longer. The orders have been extended until May 28. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

What Contact Tracing Tells Us About High-Risk Activities

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A researcher works on the diagnosis of suspected COVID-19 cases in Belo Horizonte, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, on March 26, 2020. Douglas Magno /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Magno /AFP via Getty Images

Why The Race For A Coronavirus Vaccine Will Depend On Global Cooperation

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A portion of the letter that President Trump addressed to World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, posted late Monday night on Twitter in the midst of WHO's annual assembly. @realDonaldTrump / Twitter screengrab by NPR hide caption

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@realDonaldTrump / Twitter screengrab by NPR

An aerial view of the East Bay Municipal Utility District Wastewater Treatment Plant on in Oakland, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

What You Flush Is Helping Track The Coronavirus

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A man walks past a sign reading "Welcome Back, Now Open" on Fort Lauderdale Beach Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on May 18. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Indoor Spread, Workers' Anxieties, And Our Warped Sense Of Time

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Douglas Loverro, associate NASA administrator for the human exploration and operations mission directorate, in an official portrait taken in January. Loverro announced his resignation on Tuesday. Aubrey Gemignani/NASA hide caption

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Aubrey Gemignani/NASA
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Anxious? Meditation Can Help You 'Relax Into The Uncertainty' Of The Pandemic

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Varham Muradyan for NPR

Are There Zombie Viruses — Like The 1918 Flu — Thawing In The Permafrost?

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Daniel Wood/NPR

Traffic Is Way Down Because Of Lockdown, But Air Pollution? Not So Much

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A woman playing with slime. Slime is a popular subject of videos meant to trigger the ASMR response. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

The Squishy, Slimey Science Of ASMR

Encore episode. The science is nascent and a little squishy, but researchers like Giulia Poerio are trying to better understand ASMR — a feeling triggered in the brains of some people by whispering, soft tapping, and delicate gestures. She explains how it works, and tells reporter Emily Kwong why slime might be an Internet fad that is, for some, a sensory pleasure-trigger.

The Squishy, Slimey Science Of ASMR

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Demonstrators protest in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on May 15, demanding the reopening of the state and against Governor Tom Wolf's shutdown orders during the coronavirus pandemic. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Encouraging Vaccine News; Pandemic Grows More Political

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Volunteers for the grassroots network Columbia Community Care organize donated groceries and household items at one of five distribution sites in Howard County, Maryland. Courtesy of Erika Strauss Chavarria hide caption

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Courtesy of Erika Strauss Chavarria

A view of Moderna headquarters in Cambridge, Mass., earlier this month. Moderna is touting preliminary data from an initial coronavirus vaccine trial. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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An aerial view of the Plinian eruption column, Mount St. Helens, on May 18, 1980. Robert Krimmel/USGS hide caption

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Robert Krimmel/USGS

'It Seemed Apocalyptic' 40 Years Ago When Mount St. Helens Erupted

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A clock in Nantes, France. Loic Venance/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP via Getty Images

President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 15. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

The Government's Vaccine Push; Businesses Struggle With Reopening Rules

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Rick Bright filed a whistleblower complaint after he was removed from his post as head of the agency charged with developing a vaccine against coronavirus. He said he was removed for opposing the use of malaria drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine as treatments for the coronavirus. Those drugs were promoted by President Donald Trump despite little scientific evidence for their efficacy. Greg Nash/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Whistleblower: U.S. Lost Valuable Time, Warns Of 'Darkest Winter In Modern History'

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President Donald Trump, flanked by tables holding testing supplies and machines, speaks during a press briefing about coronavirus testing in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 11, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

White House List Of Testing Labs Wasn't Helpful, States Say

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