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Former Equifax CEO Richard Smith testifies about the company's massive data breach before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Guttmacher Institute

For Many Women, The Nearest Abortion Provider Is Hundreds Of Miles Away

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The Peace Monument stands in front of the U.S. Capitol where an American flag flies at half-staff following a mass shooting in Las Vegas late Sunday that killed over 50 people. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The Supreme Court, pictured in June, opened its new term on Monday. The justices heard arguments in a case about nonunion employees' right to take action against alleged illegality by their employer. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maureen Scalia holds one of her favorite photos of her and her husband, the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, in their home in Virginia. Jennifer Kerrigan/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Kerrigan/NPR

Antonin Scalia's Less Well-Known Legacy: His Speeches

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Chairman Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C, (right) and Vice Chairman Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., listen during a hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on June 21 on Capitol Hill. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Judge Rules That Black Lives Matter Cannot Be Sued

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In this March 10, 2014, photo, Masterpiece Cakeshop owner Jack Phillips decorates a cake inside his store, in Lakewood, Colo. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Supreme Court To Open A Whirlwind Term

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Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., (left) standing with Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, (right) talk about the SUCCEED Act during a Monday news conference on Capitol Hill. Their proposal is aimed at protecting the legal status of hundreds of thousands of immigrants brought to the country illegally as children. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price, shown here at a discussion about opioids on Thursday, drew fire for his use of private jets. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump holds a rally for Alabama Republican Senate candidate Luther Strange on Sept. 22 in Huntsville, Ala. After Strange lost the primary race, Trump's tweets promoting him were deleted. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., walks through Statuary Hall at the U.S. Capitol as he returns to work Thursday after being injured in a shooting at the Republican Congressional baseball team practice on June 14. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Twitter officials are expected to meet with Senate Intelligence Committee investigators. Staffers want to know about the use of fake accounts, bots and trolls to influence the trends and topics on the social platform. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

An exterior view of the entrance to the Trump International Hotel at the Old Post Office Building in Washington, D.C. Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch Criticized For Speech At Trump's D.C. Hotel

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