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Actress Lori Loughlin and her husband, clothing designer Mossimo Giannulli, have agreed to plead guilty to charges from a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

People stand in line at a Detroit polling place during Michigan's March 10 presidential primary. As a result of the pandemic, the state's top election official is sending absentee ballot applications to every registered voter for August and November elections. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General William Barr, here at a White House briefing in March, appointed a U.S. attorney in 2019 to look into the origins of the Russia probe. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Martin Shkreli, the former pharmaceutical CEO widely disdained as "Pharma Bro," won't be released early from prison to develop a coronavirus treatment. Greg Allen/Greg Allen/Invision/AP hide caption

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Greg Allen/Greg Allen/Invision/AP

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced today that the NYPD will no longer require people to wear masks in public, unless the absence of a mask presents a "serious danger." He's seen here on March 31. Stefan Jeremiah/Reuters hide caption

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Stefan Jeremiah/Reuters

This Sept. 25, 2007 file photo shows Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., delivering opening remarks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Susan Walsh/Associated Press hide caption

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Susan Walsh/Associated Press

Congressman Who Introduced Emmett Till Antilynching Act Comments On The Arbery Case

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The FBI claims Dr. Qing Wang received more than $3.6 million in grants from the NIH while also collecting money for the same research from the Chinese government. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

People return to their vehicles after gathering to honor the life of Ahmaud Arbery at Sidney Lanier Park on May 9 in Brunswick, Ga. Arbery was shot and killed while jogging in the nearby Satilla Shores neighborhood on Feb. 23. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

The Georgia Police Department That Led Arbery Shooting Case Has A Troubled Past

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The Supreme Court will decide whether Electoral College delegates are required to support the presidential candidate who wins their state. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Justices Fear 'Chaos' If Electoral College Delegates Have Free Rein

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Attorney General William Barr support passage of now-lapsed surveillance authorities. Debate is expected soon in the Senate. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether the states have the power to remove or fine "faithless electors." Mark Sherman/AP hide caption

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Mark Sherman/AP

Supreme Court Considers Pivotal Electoral College Case

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Aimee Stephens' Supreme Court case is over the question of whether employers can fire workers for being transgender. "We're not asking for anything special. We're just asking to be treated like other people are," Stephens told The Detroit News last year. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

President Trump's pre-presidential financial records were the subject of Tuesday's arguments before the Supreme Court. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Will Supreme Court Bail Out Trump In Subpoenas For Financial Records?

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President Trump's financial records from the period before he entered the White House are under scrutiny in the latest Supreme Court showdown. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Supreme Court Hears Cases Involving Trump's Taxes, Financial Records

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