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Shots - Health News

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Blood collection tubes sit in a rack on the first day of a free COVID-19 antibody testing event at the Volusia County Fairgrounds in DeLand, Fla., on May 4. Paul Hennessy/Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Getting An Antibody Test For The Coronavirus? Here's What It Won't Tell You

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Anthony Reyes, a police officer with the City of Miami, shows the results of his coronavirus antibody test at the Hard Rock Stadium testing site in Miami Gardens, Fla., in early May. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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A Double-Barreled Approach To Antibody Testing Could Improve Accuracy

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Freeways in Oakland, as in much of California, saw much lighter traffic — and fewer fatal traffic collisions — in the early weeks of the pandemic's stay-at-home rules. Jane Tyska/Digital First Media/East Bay Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Jane Tyska/Digital First Media/East Bay Times via Getty Images

Camdyn and Caydance Austin play together at their home in Windsor, Illinois. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media
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Anxious? Meditation Can Help You 'Relax Into The Uncertainty' Of The Pandemic

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The COVID-19 pandemic has caused routine and life-saving procedures for patients with cancer to be sidelined and delayed. Postponed chemotherapy is sometimes part of the hold-up, with clinics able to handle fewer patients safely each day. Harry Sieplinga/Getty Images hide caption

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For Cancer Patients, Anguish Grows Over Deferred Surgery As Risk Rises

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Medical examiners and coroners are the last stop for investigating unexpected deaths, including those who may have died of COVID-19. In April, the Cook County Medical Examiner opened a surge center to handle overflow from Chicago-area hospital morgues. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP
Daniel Wood/NPR

Traffic Is Way Down Because Of Lockdown, But Air Pollution? Not So Much

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Dr. Max Lazarus, a medical resident at a hospital on Long Island, N.Y., is one of some 130,000 medical residents in the U.S., many of whom have found themselves on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. Max Lazarus hide caption

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Max Lazarus

Doctors In Training Learn Hard Lessons During The Pandemic

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A patient arrives to pick up medication for opioid addiction and is given hand sanitizer at a clinic in Olympia, Wash. The pandemic is changing the distribution networks and supplies of street drugs across the United States, authorities say. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Changes In Opioid Supply Create New Risks As Stay-At-Home Rules Ease

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Casa de Salud clinicians, staff and health apprentices socially distance outside their New Mexico clinic. The facility is one of many social safety net clinics that haven't yet received pandemic-related funding and are now on the brink financially. Elizabeth Boyce/Casa de Salud hide caption

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Elizabeth Boyce/Casa de Salud

A nurse at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Manhattan holds a cellphone last month so a COVID-19 patient can see and listen to his family. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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New Evidence Suggests COVID-19 Patients On Ventilators Usually Survive

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A nurse and National Guard medic interview a patient before taking a swab for a coronavirus test last month at Gallatin High School in Gallatin, Tenn. The state of Tennessee started picking up the tab for testing in April. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Two Red Cross nurses carry a person on a stretcher during a demonstration at the Red Cross Emergency Ambulance Station in Washington, D.C., in 1918. Underwood Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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What The 1918 Flu Can Teach Us About Handling Today's Pandemic

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President Donald Trump, flanked by tables holding testing supplies and machines, speaks during a press briefing about coronavirus testing in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 11, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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White House List Of Testing Labs Wasn't Helpful, States Say

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