Coronavirus Daily A daily news podcast about the coronavirus pandemic, covering all dimensions of the story from science to economics and politics as well as society and culture. Hosted by Kelly McEvers from Embedded. Approximately 10 minutes in length. Publishing weekday afternoons. Includes stories and interviews from NPR's Science, International, National, Business and Washington reporting teams, as well as station reporters, and the crews at Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Coronavirus Daily

From NPR

A daily news podcast about the coronavirus pandemic, covering all dimensions of the story from science to economics and politics as well as society and culture. Hosted by Kelly McEvers from Embedded. Approximately 10 minutes in length. Publishing weekday afternoons. Includes stories and interviews from NPR's Science, International, National, Business and Washington reporting teams, as well as station reporters, and the crews at Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Most Recent Episodes

A sign "Temporarily Closed" is seen in front of a store amid the coronavirus pandemic on May 14, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia. - Another 3 million people filed initial unemployment claims last week on a seasonally adjusted basis, according to the Department of Labor. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

A new analysis from Columbia University says that roughly 36,000 people could've been saved if the United States had started social distancing just one week earlier. But that all hinges on whether people would have been willing to stay home.

Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

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Armed demonstrators protest in Lansing, Michigan, during a rally organized by Michigan United for Liberty on May 14 to protest the coronavirus pandemic stay-at-home orders. Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer said on May 13 that protests against the state's emergency orders might make it necessary for the state to keep restrictions in place longer. The orders have been extended until May 28. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

What Contact Tracing Tells Us About High-Risk Activities

Three-quarters of Americans are concerned that a second wave of coronavirus cases will emerge, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Despite that, groups around the country, including in Michigan, are protesting state lockdowns.

What Contact Tracing Tells Us About High-Risk Activities

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A man walks past a sign reading "Welcome Back, Now Open" on Fort Lauderdale Beach Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on May 18. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Indoor Spread, Workers' Anxieties, And Our Warped Sense Of Time

There are still a lot of questions about how the coronavirus is transmitted through air. Researchers are looking at how the virus is spread indoors and how to safely have people under one roof.

Indoor Spread, Workers' Anxieties, And Our Warped Sense Of Time

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Demonstrators protest in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on May 15, demanding the reopening of the state and against Governor Tom Wolf's shutdown orders during the coronavirus pandemic. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Encouraging Vaccine News; Pandemic Grows More Political

A new coronavirus vaccine candidate shows encouraging results. It's early, but preliminary data shows it appears to be eliciting the kind of immune response capable of preventing disease.

Encouraging Vaccine News; Pandemic Grows More Political

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Q & A: Sleep Problems And Summer Childcare

Sleep experts answer listener questions about insomnia, and a nurse practitioner offers advice to parents about summer childcare.

Q & A: Sleep Problems And Summer Childcare

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President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 15. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

The Government's Vaccine Push; Businesses Struggle With Reopening Rules

To speed up the process of developing a coronavirus vaccine, the Trump Administration says the government will invest in manufacturing the top candidates even before one is proven to work.

The Government's Vaccine Push; Businesses Struggle With Reopening Rules

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Rick Bright filed a whistleblower complaint after he was removed from his post as head of the agency charged with developing a vaccine against coronavirus. He said he was removed for opposing the use of malaria drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine as treatments for the coronavirus. Those drugs were promoted by President Donald Trump despite little scientific evidence for their efficacy. Greg Nash/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Whistleblower: U.S. Lost Valuable Time, Warns Of 'Darkest Winter In Modern History'

Career government scientist-turned-whistleblower Rick Bright testified before Congress Thursday that without a stronger federal response to the coronavirus, 2020 could be the "darkest winter in modern history."

Whistleblower: U.S. Lost Valuable Time, Warns Of 'Darkest Winter In Modern History'

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Demonstrators take part in an "American Patriot Rally," organized on April 30 by Michigan United for Liberty on the steps of the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, demanding the reopening of businesses. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Public Health Vs. Politics; Lessons From An Anti-Mask Protest

The U.S. has more coronavirus deaths than any country in the world. Dr. Anthony Fauci says the number of American fatalities is likely an under count.

Public Health Vs. Politics; Lessons From An Anti-Mask Protest

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Senators listen to Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speak remotely during the Senate Committee for Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions hearing to examine COVID-19 and Safely Getting Back to Work and Back to School on May 12. Win McNamee/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Testing, Reopening Schools, Vaccines: Fauci And Others Testify

In a Senate committee hearing on Tuesday, Chair Lamar Alexander of Tennessee asked Dr. Anthony Fauci whether coronavirus treatments or a vaccine could be developed in time to allow college students to return to school in the fall. Fauci said that "would be a bridge too far."

Testing, Reopening Schools, Vaccines: Fauci And Others Testify

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Father Christoper Williams of the Basilica of San Albino performs the Eucharist during an outdoor mass on May 2 in Mesilla, New Mexico. Amid the coronavirus pandemic, Catholics in many parishes around the country haven't been able to attend masses due to the outbreak of COVID-19, but Father Christopher Williams has set up drive in masses with distribution of communion using gloves and masks. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

How To Stay Safe As States Reopen; The Latest on Masks

Democrats want another stimulus plan, but Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin says the Trump administration wants to wait before providing any further aid.

How To Stay Safe As States Reopen; The Latest on Masks

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