Code Switch Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.
Code Switch
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.More from Code Switch »

Most Recent Episodes

Puerto Ricans are migrants not immigrants, Spanish and English, domestic yet foreign — as we like to say on Code Switch, it's complicated. A hundred years ago this week, Puerto Ricans became U.S. citizens by law with the passing of the Jones Act. Since then, they've had a complicated and fraught relationship with what it means to be America .Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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.Kristen Uroda for NPR

Puerto Rico, My Heart's Devotion

The haphazard response to Hurricane Maria has underscored the tricky, in-between space that Puerto Ricans occupy. They're U.S. citizens — although nearly half of the country doesn't know that. But those who live in Puerto Rico don't enjoy many of the same privileges as citizens on the mainland. In this week's episode, Shereen travels to one of the most Puerto Rican enclaves in the country to explore the fraught relationship Puerto Ricans have with their American-ness.

Chelsea Beck/NPR

Befuddled By Babies, Love And Ice Pops? Ask Code Switch

When social interactions become racially charged, sometimes even the most woke among us are prone to faux pas. So this week, we're taking on our listeners' most burning questions about race. We'll talk weddings. We'll talk kiddos. And most of all, we'll talk paletas.

Befuddled By Babies, Love And Ice Pops? Ask Code Switch

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As the burgeoning marijuana industry booms, who is reaping the benefits, and who is being left behind? Chelsea Beck hide caption

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Chelsea Beck

A Weed Boom, But For Whom?

The history of cannabis in the U.S. ― and its criminalization ― is deeply interwoven with race. As the legal cannabis market gains traction, people of color who were targeted by the drug war could be left out of the green rush.

A Weed Boom, But For Whom?

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Amy Gonzalez lives in the hottest part of Los Angeles, where average temperatures are rising. Molly Peterson for NPR hide caption

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Molly Peterson for NPR

It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

On this week's episode we talk about why certain communities are more vulnerable to catastrophic weather events like hurricanes and heat waves. Saying "mother nature doesn't discriminate," ignores the fact that discrimination exacerbates her wrath.

It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

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Tom Burrell, ad man. Courtesy of Tom Burrell hide caption

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Courtesy of Tom Burrell

An Advertising Revolution: "Black People Are Not Dark-Skinned White People"

How do you get black people to buy cigarettes made for cowboys and antebellum-style beer? Turns out, you don't. On this episode: Tom Burrell, who transformed the ad industry with a simple motto, "Black people are not dark-skinned white people."

An Advertising Revolution: "Black People Are Not Dark-Skinned White People"

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A recent scuffle between an elotero and a pedestrian in Hollywood re-energized discussion about legalizing street vending in California. Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido

'I'm Not A Racist, I'm Argentine!'

On this week's episode, a viral video gives us the opportunity to talk about racism towards and within the Latino community. When a Latino flipped over a street vendor's cart in Los Angeles, many were surprised it was a Latino-on-Latino incident. We'll talk about why the video is surprising and why it isn't.

'I'm Not A Racist, I'm Argentine!'

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Monuments to Confederate generals and a church line Monument Avenue in Richmond, Va. Jay Paul/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Paul/Getty Images

The Unfinished Battle In the Capital Of The Confederacy

As calls to remove Confederate memorials grow louder, we head to Richmond, Va., where the veneration of Confederate leaders has been a source of local pride — and revulsion — for more than a century.

The Unfinished Battle In the Capital Of The Confederacy

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White supremacists descended on Charlottesville to protest the pending removal of the statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee in the city's Emancipation Park. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

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Julia Rendleman/AP

Charlottesville

After a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville spiraled into deadly violence, residents of the Virginia town do some soul-searching. Plus: a scholar on the politics of white resentment, and a GOP operative worries about the party's long-term future.

Charlottesville

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Christina Chung for NPR

Who's Your Great-Great-Great-Great Granddaddy?

Spit into a tube and get in touch with your ancestors! Or not. On this episode we interview the founder of a project that uses DNA tests to talk about race in America. And Kim TallBear, a Native American anthropologist, says why she thinks DNA tests don't really tell you much about yourself.

Who's Your Great-Great-Great-Great Granddaddy?

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

The U.S. Census and Our Sense of Us

The Census is so much more than cold, hard data. It's about what we call ourselves, the ways we see ourselves and how we're represented. On this episode we ask the former head of the Census bureau why he quit. We talk about how the Census helped create 'Hispanic' identity. And we talk through some of the proposed race and ethnicity categories that may show up on the 2020 questionnaire.

The U.S. Census and Our Sense of Us

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