Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

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Kansas National Guard member Roy Manns, from Topeka, Kan., writes down results as he runs samples through an Abbott COVID-19 testing machine at a drive-thru testing site on Wednesday in Dodge City, Kan. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Blood collection tubes sit in a rack on the first day of a free COVID-19 antibody testing event at the Volusia County Fairgrounds in DeLand, Fla., on May 4. Paul Hennessy/Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Getting An Antibody Test For The Coronavirus? Here's What It Won't Tell You

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FDA Worries COVID-19 Test Misses Too Many People Who Are Infected

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U.S. Coronavirus Testing Still Falls Short. How's Your State Doing?

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An illustration shows spiky antigens studding the virus's outer coat. Tests under development that look for these antigens might be faster than PCR tests for diagnosing COVID-19, proponents say. But the tests might still need PCR-test confirmation. Sergii Iaremenko/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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A Next-Generation Coronavirus Test Raises Hopes And Concerns

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Coronavirus Updates: President Signs Bill, Clarifies Disinfectant Suggestion

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What Happened Today: Trump's Order To Limit Immigration, Testing Questions

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More Questions About Testing For COVID-19, Answered

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CDC Director Shares Plan On Contact Tracing

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People stand in line as they wait to get tested for COVID-19 at a just-opened testing center in the Harlem section of New York on Monday. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Study Raises Questions About False Negatives From Quick COVID-19 Test

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Coronavirus Updates: Mixed Messages From The President

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White House Issues New Guidelines For States To Reopening After Coronavirus Shutdowns

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Coronavirus Updates: The Economic Toll

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